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Cooperations in the steel industry

Research networks bundle the forces between various disciplines

Cooperations with universities, research facilities and industrial partners from all parts of the value-creation chain are a permanent component of the research and development activities of thyssenkrupp Steel. Aim of the cooperation with external partners: We ensure the continuous know-how flow even beyond corporate borders. This enables the incorporation of decisive impulses, which help us with the early detection of material trends, future technologies and specific customer requirements.

In return, the cooperation partners benefit: They acquire easier access to the main focal points of industrial research and the opportunity of examining scientific and theoretical findings within the framework of specific practical applications and understanding them in greater depth.en.

New Crash Management System: KIRCHHOFF Automotive & thyssenkrupp Steel

The innovative Crash Management System, which has been jointly developed by the automotive supplier and the steel supplier is lighter and more cost-effective. The press-hardenable manganese-boron steel MBW-K® 1900 made by thyssenkrupp Steel is used in the novel Crash Management System by KIRCHHOFF Automotive.

Optimized MAG welding: KIRCHHOFF Automotive & thyssenkrupp Steel

Silicate deposits on weld seams can be significantly reduced in the future thanks to an improved welding process for metal active gas welding (MAG) and an optimized pickling process.

Open Hybrid LabFactory: Collaborative research with industrial partners

As part of a research project, thyssenkrupp Steel is working together with partners to develop hybrid materials made of steel and plastic. Lightweight materials construction is the order of the day – especially in the automotive industry. That’s because lightweight cars consume less fuel, which reduces CO2 emissions.

ICAMS: Ruhr University Bochum & thyssenkrupp Steel

A prominent example of a long-term strategic partnership is the establishment of the Interdisciplinary Center for Advanced Materials Simulation (ICAMS) at the Ruhr University in Bochum. ICAMS is a one-of-its-kind development center in Europe for new high-tech materials.

The "Advanced Materials Simulation" used in Bochum is a key innovative technology in materials development. The objective of ICAMS is primarily to model new materials on the computer and predict their properties by simulation. Using a multiscale approach, all of the dimensions relevant to the materials are incorporated into the simulation – from the atomic structure, through the microstructure to the macroscopic properties. In collaboration with the ICAMS researchers we will be able to put improved materials on the market even faster and fulfill customer requirements even more accurately.

StreetScooter: RWTH Aachen & thyssenkrupp Steel

The first emission-free, low-noise StreetScooters are delivering letters and packages throughout Germany. thyssenkrupp Steel has been a partner from day one.

blue.cruiser: Bochum University & thyssenkrupp

The time is ripe for sustainable solar vehicles that are practical for everyday use. Students at the Bochum University of Applied Sciences proved this is possible together with the thyssenkrupp. In 2017 the blue.cruiser was awarded second place at the World Solarcar World Championship in Australia.

InnoCity: Dortmund University of Applied Sciences & thyssenkrupp Steel

Rapid urban growth presents challenges for us all, but none more so than for town planners and authorities. The development of urban infrastructure is a task focusing on the future of cities around the world. As part of a competition, experienced and successful engineers from thyssenkrupp Steel worked together with students from the Dortmund University of Applied Sciences to answer the key question: what will the urbanized living space of the future urbanized living space of the future look like?

SpeedE: Instituts für Kraftfahrzeuge Aachen (ika) & thyssenkrupp Steel

The partners are jointly doing research on how cars will be driven in the future. They designed a research vehicle ready for the road: The SpeedE’s front end is made out of a steel-CFRP sandwich material.

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